Looming Code Changes

Near the end of 2017, ASHRAE Journal published an interesting article about building codes development and adoption.

Fast forward, 2018 has already been a noteworthy year for building codes.

More specifically, with the latest release of IECC and other code changes, some have called 2018 the “Year of the Duct.” There are looming code changes for duct system standards you should know. We’ve highlighted a few of them below.

SPC 215: “This standard specifies a method of test to determine leakage airflow and fractional leakage of operating HVAC air distribution systems, and determines the uncertainty of the test results.” 

California Title 24: “The California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards are designed to ensure new and existing buildings achieve energy efficiency and preserve outdoor and indoor environmental quality. These measures (Title 24, Part 6) are listed in the California Code of Regulations. The California Energy Commission is responsible for adopting, implementing and updating building energy efficiency. Local city and county enforcement agencies have the authority to verify compliance with applicable building codes, including energy efficiency.” 

ASHRAE 189.1: “Standard 189.1 provides total building sustainability guidance for designing, building, and operating high-performance green buildings. From site location to energy use to recycling, this standard sets the foundation for green buildings by addressing site sustainability, water use efficiency, energy efficiency, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and the building’s impact on the atmosphere, materials and resources.”

ASHRAE Handbook: See the following chapters focus on duct design and construction:

  • 02 Fundamentals | 21 Duct Design
  • 02 HVAC Systems and Equipment | 19 Duct Construction

SMACNA HVAC Duct Construction Standards, 4th edition: Read about this code update for duct tightness that went into review last year. Anticipation is building for what’s next.

IECC 2018: With the typical time difference between code development and code adoption being three years, watch for many builders and building code authorities to adopt IECC 2012/2015.

Want to learn more about the changing and growing building codes? We’ve got a couple upcoming free webinars you might like.

First, commercial sheet metal business experts John Hauser and Mike McCarthy from Eastern Metalworks will be discussing their experiences in the sheet metal industry, synergies of duct sealing for sheet metal businesses, and more on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 at 1:30pm ET (10:30am PT). Learn More at www.aeroseal.com/success-series-webinar-2/

Second, BPI Technical Director John Jones will be sharing insights into cracking the new codes for residential new construction on Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 3:00pm ET (12:00pm PT). Learn More at www.aeroseal.com/res/2018-webinar-series/building-codes/

Source: Aeroseal

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

American Dental Association Improves Ventilation, Meets Code with Aeroseal

For the past decade, Mike Kosinski and his team of experts at CEPro Inc. have been taking great care of the historic ADA building on Chicago’s Near North Side. Built in 1965, the 23-story skyscraper has undergone numerous upgrades and renovations, but none as transformative as those being planned for the building’s 4th-floor medical laboratory. Unfortunately, leaks in risers that connect the labs fume hoods to two rooftop fans were making adequate ventilation impossible. Not able to meet stringent exhaust code specification, some of the fume hoods were simply rendered inoperable. Without a solution to the problem, laboratory renovation was impractical. Talks of having to relocate the entire facility had begun to surface.

Each of the building risers were actually encased in individual concrete structures that draped over the side of the building’s exterior. That meant accessing the enclosed ductwork to seal the leaks would require nothing less than major building demolition. With no alternative, the leaks continued to plague the facility.

In Brief

  • Building: American Dental Association Building
  • Location: Chicago, Illinois
  • Building Managers: CEPro Inc.
  • Aeroseal Contractor: Airways Systems Inc.
  • Goal: Meet code for proper lab fume hood operations
  • Before Aeroseal: 2,733.00 CFM of leakage
  • After Aeroseal: 606 CFM of leakage
  • Results: Aeroseal eliminated 2,127 CFM of leakage. With proper exhaust now possible, all fume hoods are back up and operational. Renovation on schedule.

That’s when CEPro’s Mike Wessel, learned about a new approach to duct sealing that worked from the inside of the duct to find and seal leaks. After initial research and explanatory meetings with building management, Wessel got the go-ahead for a preliminary duct-sealing project. Airways Systems’ Joe St. Pierre got the call and soon, he and his team arrived on site to seal 3 of the leaky shafts.

When finished, the print out report generated by the Aeroseal system provided immediate results – Aeroseal reduced leakage by as much as 94.5%. A week later, Joe got the go ahead to seal the rest of the leaky shafts. In the end, Joe and his team reduced leakage by more than 2,000 CFM, more than enough to meet code and get all fume hoods up and operational. Renovation of the ADA lab is back on the schedule and moving forward.

Testimonial

My story is simple. I was skeptical that the Aerosealing would work. I watched the process and found it magical because it was so simple. And in the end, we went from having doubting clients to having customers that were gleeful and happy, bristling with excitement because their life just got infinitely easier.”

There was simply no other practical solution. If not for the Aeroseal, we would be moving the lab right now, incurring millions of dollars to change strategy and writing off millions in investment that had already been made in the building. Aeroseal extended the life of their investment – I can’t even estimate the total cost savings this represents.”

Michael Wessel
Project Engineer
CEPro, Inc.

Source: Aeroseal

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at

1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Overview of the Air Duct Cleaning Process


NADCA members are accustomed to handling a variety of projects for commercial and industrial buildings. NADCA’s presence in the commercial HVAC industry is growing steadily as education about our members’ services grows. It is becoming increasingly common for project proposals to specify the presence of an ASCS certified individual on a commercial job.

When hiring a NADCA member, an optimal level of performance should be expected. Technicians are required to adhere to the industry’s standards and guidelines, and inform the client of any obstacles that may prevent doing so. NADCA members are able to able to answer most questions about a particular project, including safety issues and are able to provide proof that the job has been done correctly.  

Through clear, concise communications, air duct cleaning contractors can provide their clients with a better understanding of the work to be undertaken and demonstrate that the project will be well managed. Clients should also clearly define the scope of work they desire and are encouraged to utilize NADCA’s General Specifications for the Cleaning and Restoration of Commercial Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems.

HVAC system cleaning projects require a game plan. Project length can vary from a few hours to six months or more. The size and scope of the project are the two key elements that will have an impact on the length of time necessary for completion. The entire duct cleaning project will run smoothest when an in-depth review is first conducted to determine the expectations and desired outcome for both the customer and duct cleaning company. 

  • During cleaning, the entire HVAC system is placed under continuous negative pressure — with a vacuum — to prevent the spread of contaminants.
  • Continuous negative pressure allows very fine particles to be removed from the system as they become airborne, ensuring that these particles are not released into the living space when the system is turned on after cleaning.
  • This negative pressure also serves to extract the loosened contaminants, which are collected and removed from your home.

Often, HVAC system components collect significant amounts of debris and particulate during construction activities within a building. NADCA recommends that newly installed HVAC systems or HVAC systems undergoing renovation be verified clean and protected before the system is permitted to operate.

Source: From NADCA’s “The Facility Manager’s Guide to Sick Buildings & Indoor Air Quality.”

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Contact us for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs: 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer.