Recent Outbreak of Legionnaires Disease Underscores Role Duct Leakage Plays In Transmitting Airborne Contaminants

Aspen Note: A similar outbreak of Legionnaires Disease at a hotel in southern New Hampshire this summer prompted us to share the following article with our customers, prospects, and friends in an effort to make them aware of the importance of good air quality.

Recent Outbreak of Legionnaires Disease Underscores Role Duct Leakage Plays In Transmitting Airborne Contaminants

Aeroseal joins CDC, American Lung Association and Others Recommending Effective Duct Sealing To Combat Health Risks Associated With Poor Indoor Air Quality

A recent outbreak of Legionnaires disease in New York City has contributed to an increased interest among property owners and facility managers in the role that duct leakage plays in the spread of the disease. According to Neal Walsh, senior vice president of Aeroseal LLC, a duct sealing technology company, HVAC businesses throughout the East Coast and elsewhere have experienced a notable increase in customer inquires related to the Legionnaires outbreak and indoor air quality in general.

Duct Sealing from the inside: an innovation in duct sealing technology. The recent Legionnaires outbreak has sparked increased demand for Aeroseal duct sealing services.

We have heard from a number of our East Coast dealers that are responding to an uptick in calls from commercial clients that are concerned about the recent epidemic,” said Walsh. “They are learning that the microbes responsible for Legionnaires disease are typically spread through a contaminated indoor air environment, and that has led them directly to concerns about duct leakage.”

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the EPA and others, duct leakage can be a major contributor to health risks associated with poor indoor air quality. Leaks in the ductwork allow contaminants to enter the duct system at one location within a structure and then spread throughout the rest of the building.

Experts believe that Legionella Pneumophila, the bacteria that causes Legionnaires disease, is typically spread through a building’s ventilation system. In the recent New York City epidemic, the outbreak has been traced to contaminated cooling towers*, which release water mist. It is likely that the contaminated water mist spread throughout the atmosphere with the assistance of leaky ventilation systems, and then was inhaled by occupants.

It’s estimated that poor indoor air quality costs businesses as much as $100 billion a year in lost productivity, health costs and other related problems,” said Walsh. “Poor indoor air quality can cause everything from headaches, coughing and skin irritation to more serious health concerns such as what we’re seeing in New York.”

Since it first appeared in late July, more than 100 people have been diagnosed with Legionnaires Disease. While this disorder is easily diagnosed and can be treated with antibiotics, 10 people have died due to this latest outbreak.

To help minimize health risks associated with poor indoor air quality, many health organizations including the CDC, the EPA and the American Lung Association, recommend sealing ductwork. While some leaks can be addressed using traditional duct sealing methods, studies show that the most efficient and cost-effective means of sealing ductwork is with the use of aerosol-based duct sealing technology.

We are working hard to educate the public about the problems associated with poor indoor air quality and the role that duct leaks play in exacerbating the problem,” said Walsh. “The recent Legionnaires outbreak is a reminder of how easily airborne diseases can spread and put us all at risk.”

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), and is an approved Aeroseal dealer.

Call 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.


6 Simple Tips to Prepare Your Home for Fall

We may still be taking a dip in the pool, but soon we will be pulling out sweaters and cozying up on the couch to watch football. The best time to start preparing your home for the fall season is now before you turn on your heat.

Taking the following steps to prepare ahead of the colder seasons can save you from costly repairs down the road.

1. Change filters

Filters should ideally be replaced at the change of each season. A clean filter will help you heat and cool your home more efficiently than a dirty filter. Because filters trap harmful particles from being circulated in your home by forcing air through a fine mesh, a dirty filter will hinder the unit from doing its job. 

2. Check for leaks

Prevent drafts and decrease energy waste by sealing windows and doors. Don’t forget to check your ductwork for leaks as well.

3. Start warming up your unit

Similar to cars that need time to get warmed up when it’s cold outside, your HVAC system needs time to adjust to heating and may take some time to get back to its proper speed and efficiency because it sat unused for such a long time. On cooler nights or days turn your system on a low heat setting.

4. Check alarms and detectors

Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are essential devices that keep you safe. Replace batteries with new ones and push the test button on each device to make sure they are working properly. Also, keep in mind, The U.S. Fire Administration recommends that you replace your smoke detectors every 10 years.

5. Clean up your outdoor unit

If you have an outdoor unit, check for debris and damage. Remove all debris to ensure proper airflow and prevent dirt or leaves from getting inside the unit and on the coils. If you see any signs of damage, give your HVAC contractor a call.

6. Schedule an air duct checkup

The best way to prepare your home for fall is to schedule a maintenance checkup with your local NADCA certified contractor. Having your system cleaned regularly will improve indoor air quality, extend the life of your system and increase the energy efficiency of your home because a clean unit doesn’t have to work as hard to maintain the temperature you desire.

Source: National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA)

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), and is an approved Aeroseal dealer.

Call 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Fall Is Air Duct Cleaning Season


If giving a warm welcome to cooler weather and festive times with family and friends means turning up the heat in your house, there’s something you should know: You may need to clean your home’s air ducts. Air ducts and ventilation systems can get stuffed with dust, pet hair and other contaminants that get blown through your house when you kick on the furnace for the first time in the fall. Whether you notice a burning smell when the heat turns on or experience an increase in allergy symptoms, dirty air ducts may be to blame.

The debris that builds up in your home’s air ducts throughout the year can foster mold and bacteria growth, and even invite vermin into your home. Homes exposed to extreme weather conditions (like this year’s record-breaking hurricanes or the heat and ash from wildfires) are particularly at risk of developing hazardous mold and bacteria. However, extreme weather isn’t the only thing that can dirty your ductwork. Even homes in regions that are going through the normal seasonal changes see a build-up of allergen-producing spring pollen or mold caused by a humid summer. Daily living with pets and people coming in and out of a home can introduce pet hair and dirt into your home’s air ducts, causing allergic reactions when air starts flowing through the ducts and blowing the dirt through the home.

And now, with flu season on the horizon, it’s especially important to ensure the air in your home is free of common irritants that can worsen symptoms or even cause illnesses. Older people, young children and anyone with asthma or other respiratory diseases are all especially susceptible to illnesses caused by impurities in the air.

The good news is that having the ducts cleaned can save you money on energy costs in the long term. Research by the EPA has demonstrated that air duct cleaning and removing debris from your home’s heating and air conditioning system can improve efficiency and the overall quality of indoor air. And, if your health wasn’t reason enough to get your air ducts cleaned this fall, clean, efficient HVAC systems are less likely to break down and will have a longer lifespan and generally operate more effectively, saving you money and the hassle of dealing with a broken-down heating and air conditioning system.

Source: National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA)

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), and is an approved Aeroseal dealer.

Call 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.


 

Hot Tips On Getting Ready for Cold Weather

For those regions that see extreme temperatures, now is the time to prepare to ensure your home weathers cold winter temps with ease. In addition to clearing clogged gutters, closing storm windows and prepping the weather stripping on your windows and doors, checking your home’s furnace, filter and air ducts is an important part of getting your home ready for winter and ensuring the best air quality inside your home all season long.

What to Do

The first step toward winter readiness for the air inside your home is getting your heating and ventilation system cleaned. A complete cleaning should include replacing the filter on your furnace and cleaning the ductwork that runs throughout your home. This will remove built-up dirt, dust and debris, improving indoor air quality and helping your home’s heating and ventilation system run smoother.

Why Winter Readiness Matters

There are a couple key reasons that make cleaning your home’s heating and ventilation system a good idea when it comes to winter prep:

You Save Energy

According to the United States Department of Energy, 56 percent of the energy used to power your home goes to heating and ventilation systems. When those systems begin to wear, they run less efficiently. Even in new buildings, air ducts can be dirty—especially when construction or renovations were recent—and will become even dirtier through everyday use.

You Improve Indoor Air Quality

Your heating and cooling system is the lungs of your home. The system takes air in and breathes air out through the air ducts in your home. Dirt and dust are recirculated throughout your home five to seven times a day, on average. Over time, this causes a buildup of in the ductwork. Dirt may contribute to health issues, especially in people with respiratory conditions, autoimmune disorders or certain allergies. Cleaning the air ducts in your home removes dirt and dust, leading to better indoor air quality.

Source: National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA)

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), and is an approved Aeroseal dealer.

Call 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.


 

Tips for Reducing Allergens Inside the Home

When it comes to allergies, most people think of their home as a haven where they can escape their symptoms. Unfortunately, houses, apartments, and even office buildings harbor indoor allergens of their own. Through normal occupation, dust, air pollutants, and other contaminants collect in a home. Regardless of how often or thoroughly it is cleaned, some dust remains or settles back in the next day.

Many substances found in dust can trigger allergy symptoms. Other common indoor allergens include:

• Dust Mites

• Pet Dander

• Cockroaches

• Molds

Unlike seasonal allergies, indoor allergies may last all year long, and some occupants are more sensitive than others. Allergy and asthma sufferers, as well as young children and the elderly, tend to be more susceptible to poor indoor air quality.

Luckily, you can reduce indoor allergens by taking the following measures:

1. Reduce pet dander  

Eliminating pet dander from your home entirely can be an impossible task, but taking steps like cleaning your furniture and carpets can be a quick fix for removing dander from surfaces. Decluttering your space will also give dander fewer places to hide.

2. Prevent mold and mildew 

Ensure your home has sufficient ventilation, use mold inhibitors in your paints, and clean your bathroom with mold-killing products.

3. Use humidity controllers and air purifiers

Using an air conditioner or dehumidifier to keep humidity levels in your home lower than 50 percent will help prevent mold. Air purifiers will also help eliminate the number of contaminants that are in the air such as, mold, bacteria, and viruses.

4. Change air filters

Using air filters can trap pollutants such as pet dander, dust mites, and tobacco smoke. Filters work by forcing air through a fine mesh that traps these harmful particles. Cleaning and changing air conditioning filters and duct filters at each change of season will ensure your family is breathing cleaner, fresher, healthier air.

5. Schedule an air duct cleaning

HVAC systems have been shown to collect a variety of contaminants such as mold, fungi, bacteria and very small particles of dust that have the potential to affect overall health. Having your air ducts cleaned can improve your indoor air quality and reduce health problems.

Working with a qualified contractor will ensure the job is done right, which can save you a lot of time and money in the long run.

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), and is an approved Aeroseal dealer.

Call 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.


Why Clean Air Ducts? Because They Get Dirty!

Clean Your Air Ducts to Get Rid of Dangerous Allergens and Dirt.

In addition to normal accumulations of dust and dirt found in all homes with air ducts, there are several other factors that can increase the need for regular HVAC system cleaning:

pets
occupants with allergies or asthma
cigarette or cigar smoke
water contamination or damage to the home or HVAC system
home renovation or remodeling projects

Watch Aspen at work cleaning air ducts:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16HblgdisMo

Watch Aspen’s robot cleaning very dirty ducts:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJ6yXKo3v3Y

Some occupants are more sensitive to these contaminants than others. Allergy and asthma sufferers, as well as young children and the elderly tend to be more susceptible to the types of poor indoor air quality that air duct cleaning can help address.

Top Benefits of HVAC Cleaning
NADCA’s rule of thumb for consumers is that “if your air ducts look dirty, they probably are,” and that dirty HVAC systems should be inspected by a reputable, certified HVAC professional. Below are some other reasons homeowners choose to have their air ducts cleaned.

Indoor Air Quality
Indoor air quality is one concern that homeowners have when they decide to investigate air duct cleaning. Your heating and cooling system is the lungs of your home. The system takes air in and breathes air out.

Through normal occupation in a home, we generate a great deal of contaminants and air pollutants, such as dander, dust, and chemicals. These contaminants are pulled into the HVAC system and re-circulated 5 to 7 times per day, on average. Over time, this re-circulation causes a build-up of contaminants in the duct work.

While dirty ducts don’t necessarily mean unhealthy air in your home, school or workplace, they may be contributing to larger health issues or harboring contaminants that could cause serious problems for people with respiratory health conditions, autoimmune disorders or some environmental allergies.

Energy Savings
According to the U.S. Department of Energy, 25 to 40 percent of the energy used for heating or cooling a home is wasted. Contaminants in the heating and cooling system cause it to work harder and shorten the life of your system. Although filters are used, the heating and cooling system still gets dirty through normal use.

When an HVAC system is clean, it doesn’t have to work as hard to maintain the temperature you desire. As a result, less energy is used, leading to improved cost-effectiveness.

 

Sources: Content, National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA); videos Aspen Air Duct Cleaning

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), and is an approved Aeroseal dealer.

Call 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Facility Managers & Commercial Building Owners:

You Should Be Concerned about Sick Buildings
& Indoor Air Quality.

 

Watch this video, “Control Building & Occupant Health with Air Duct Cleaning”:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNaxPr6gPSg

And be sure to read our Commercial Checklist (below), which was designed to help the commercial/industrial community understand NADCA’s recommendations regarding the HVAC system cleaning process.

NADCA advises reviewing the checklist items below BEFORE hiring an air duct cleaning company.

Commercial Checklist

 

1) Qualification of the HVAC System Cleaning Contractor
The HVAC system cleaning contractor will provide the following:

• Proof of NADCA membership and ASCS certification __YES __NO

• Proof of insurance __YES __NO

• Proof of proper license(s) as applicable __YES __NO

• A written proposal __YES __NO

2) Standards & Guidelines Used by the HVAC System Cleaning Contractor
The HVAC system cleaning contractor plans to follow:

• NADCA General Specifications for Cleaning of
Commercial HVAC Systems __YES __NO

• ACR, the NADCA Standard for Assessment, Cleaning
& Restoration of HVAC Systems __YES __NO

3) Documents Reviewed by the HVAC System Cleaning Contractor:
The HVAC system cleaning contractor will:

Review project drawings __YES __NO

• Review project specifications __YES __NO

4) Inspections:
The HVAC system cleaning contractor will:

• Conduct an assessment prior to performing the work __YES __NO

5) Work Plans:
The HVAC system cleaning contractor will:

• Provide a written work plan __YES __NO

• Provide a scope of work within the work plan that
identifies what components will be cleaned or restored __YES __NO

• Outline any special requirements needed for cleaning
(i.e. power, water, lifts) __YES __NO

6) Engineering Controls:
The HVAC system cleaning contractor will:

• Define engineering controls __YES __NO

• Use vacuum collection equipment utilizing HEPA filtration
with 99.97% collection efficiency at 0.3 micron article size,
if exhausting within the building envelope __YES __NO

7) Cleaning & Restoration:
The HVAC system cleaning contractor will:

• Maintain the HVAC system at appropriate negative
pressure differential __YES __NO

• Outline the cleaning methods to be used __YES __NO

• Clean specified components in accordance with the
NADCA General Specifications __YES __NO

• Identify any chemical products that may be used and
will provide Safety Data Sheets (SDS) __YES __NO

• Report pre-existing damage to HVAC components
found during cleaning __YES __NO

8) Cleanliness Verification
The HVAC system cleaning contractor will:

• Perform cleanliness verification as outlined in the
scope of work __YES __NO

• Identify post-project documentation __YES __NO

Source: National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA)

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), and is an approved Aeroseal dealer.

Call 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Duct Leakage Testing is a Must


A recent survey of the building construction industry by the Building Commissioning Association (BCA) on the issue of duct leakage resulted in some startling statistics. Seventy-five percent of the approximately 300 respondents felt that duct leakage contributes substantially to energy loss in commercial buildings. And, 74% of the respondents also believed most of the buildings in the U.S. have significant duct leakage (greater than 15%). Duct leakage can significantly increase the energy consumption of a building, leading to increased energy bills for the owner. It increases energy costs and can result in occupant discomfort and lower productivity. This combination can transform a building intended to be a high performing building into a building that is not. So, what can be done to combat duct leakage? Test early and test often.

As a commissioning provider for high performing buildings, we observe many instances of duct leakage in both new and existing buildings. The top factors for duct leakage issues are inadequate sealing of duct joints and access doors or panels, which are related to quality of duct installation workmanship, and over-pressurization of the air distribution system resulting in duct seam separation, which is related to HVAC system control. Many owners do not include commissioning, which can identify performance issues such as lack of testing requirements in the design specifications and building performance issues that occur during the design, construction, and operational phases of a project.

Where new building codes (2010 and later) have been adopted, some duct leakage testing requirements exist. However, many states have yet to adopt the newer codes. While these new codes are beginning to require duct leakage testing, they only require 25% of the high- and medium-pressure duct be tested. As a result, duct leakage testing appears to be hit or miss when it comes to newly constructed buildings. Though a project designer can specify the required sealing level for each duct type, the only way to verify the effectiveness of the duct sealing is by duct leak testing.

It is important that design professionals specify duct leakage testing and have the commissioning provider observe duct leak testing of high- and medium-pressure ductwork in accordance with SMACNA’s HVAC Air Duct Leakage Test Manual. It is also important that the commissioning provider evaluate the building’s controls.

Allowable duct leakage rates specified are around 10%. However, for high performing buildings, designers may elect to reduce the allowable leakage amount in an effort to further reduce the energy consumption of the air moving systems. By specifying SMACNA duct leakage testing for medium- and high-pressure air duct systems integrated with commissioning in their projects, design professionals can be confident that their building will meet the high performing requirements of the owner.

The survey by the BCA also noted that a majority of respondents felt duct leakage is most prevalent in existing buildings. This should come as no surprise to individuals in the building industry. Many of the existing buildings that are prime candidates for services such as energy audits or retro-commissioning were built 15 or more years ago. Even if duct leakage testing was performed when the buildings were constructed, the sealant materials can be either near the end of their useful life or have begun to deteriorate, which leads to increased duct leakage.

Typical building maintenance programs do not include observations and maintenance of the duct sealants, and even if they did it would be nearly impossible for all seams and joints to be evaluated, let alone resealed from the exterior. What is the answer? Very cost-effective products that can be applied to the interior of the air distribution system that can seal most air loss paths. Maintaining a sealed air distribution system should be included in a building’s operation and maintenance (O&M) budgets, similar to sealants for the building enclosure. This is a simple way for building owners to keep their buildings’ energy consumption low.

If owners elect to have energy audit or retro-commissioning services performed on their building, they should require that these professionals evaluate the leakage of the existing ductwork. This can provide the owner with a low-cost energy measure that can potentially have a very low payback period.

It is clear to the building industry that duct leakage is an issue. For buildings looking to be labeled as high performing buildings, it can be a significant issue. Therefore, it is imperative that engineers require duct leak testing and that commissioning providers ensure duct leakage is minimized. The simplest way to stop or significantly reduce duct leakage is to require testing and verification of the air distribution and exhaust systems’ installation and HVAC control function through the design and commissioning process.

Source: Aeroseal; written by H. Jay Enck, Member ASHRAE, HBDP, BEAP, CPMP, CxAP, LEED Fellow, is cofounder and chief technical officer and David Cantrill, P.E., Member ASHRAE, BEAP, CCP, is branch manager, commissioning authority and project manager with Commissioning and Green Building Solutions, Inc.

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).


What’s In Your Home’s Air Ducts?


You probably have given very little thought to your home’s air ducts. They’re just there, doing their job blowing warm or cool air throughout your home. No problem, right? Well, considering the average home in America is 35 years old, chances are there are years of build-up in your home’s air ducts. Just what could be inside of your home’s air ducts? Read on to discover some the weirdest things professional air duct cleaners have found on the job.

A few years ago, during a cleaning job, we found a box behind a register that contained $400 of Confederate money. We gave it to the homeowner and she gave it to her children, who cashed it out. That $400 of Confederate money ended up being worth $100,000!

We got a call from a customer saying they had a mysterious odor in the home. Our technicians went into the home and they definitely smelled something very strong, but couldn’t find anything obvious at the start. Finally, they took off the vent covers and found a dead skunk!

We do a lot of post-construction after homes are built, especially townhouses, and one thing we find a lot of is pee bottles used by workers during construction. It’s gross, but they’re everywhere, on every job. During a cleaning, one of those bottles got sucked up into our negative air machine, went through the blower blade and sprayed everywhere outside. It was really disgusting.

We were cleaning ductwork and in the basement of the establishment, there was a kitchen with a grill. Right above that was the bulkhead with an air duct blowing right over the grill, which we were cleaning. We took off the supply duct, shined a light in there and, low and behold, there was a giant, dead rat. In the course of cleaning, the gentleman befriended us and offered to make us lunch on the grill. We politely declined the offer.

We had posted a video of a cleaning job to our social media account and someone commented on it, “Wow, did you see the dollar bill get sucked in there?” The trunk line was really full of all kinds of junk, so I thought “Well, I’m not surprised that there was a dollar bill in that mess.” Later on, someone commented, “That wasn’t a dollar bill, that was a $100 bill!” I went into the truck and sifted through all the garbage to try to find it, but no luck.

We did a cleaning on an old rail car and found a pre-Civil War whiskey bottle stashed away in the ducts of the rail car. The bottle is now sitting a museum somewhere.

View the following 3 crazy but true videos!

Crazy Duct Cleaning Stories Part 1:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUKczIYqYog

Crazy Duct Cleaning Stories Part 2:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zx2mlvg2hkI

Crazy Duct Cleaning Stories Part 3:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=STe_qnFhjfU

Source: National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA)

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at
1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Heating and Air Conditioning Maintenance

The warm summer weather is just starting in the northeast, and that means checking to make sure your air conditioner is in good working order. None of us want to experience an inefficient AC that costs money but doesn’t deliver—or worse, an AC BREAKDOWN in our home or office on a 90 degree day!

Following are 5 tips on how to keep your air conditioning system running efficiently:

• Test pipe or tubing joints or connections for leaks, using pressure gauge or soap-and-water solution.
• Test electrical circuits or components for continuity, using electrical test equipment.
• Repair or replace defective equipment, components, or wiring.
• Discuss heating or cooling system malfunctions with users to isolate or to verify that repairs corrected malfunctions.
Repair or service heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems to improve efficiency, such as by changing filters, cleaning ducts, or refilling non-toxic refrigerants. 

Source: The Occupational Information Network (O-NET); O-NET was developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at
1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).