Looming Code Changes

Near the end of 2017, ASHRAE Journal published an interesting article about building codes development and adoption.

Fast forward, 2018 has already been a noteworthy year for building codes.

More specifically, with the latest release of IECC and other code changes, some have called 2018 the “Year of the Duct.” There are looming code changes for duct system standards you should know. We’ve highlighted a few of them below.

SPC 215: “This standard specifies a method of test to determine leakage airflow and fractional leakage of operating HVAC air distribution systems, and determines the uncertainty of the test results.” 

California Title 24: “The California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards are designed to ensure new and existing buildings achieve energy efficiency and preserve outdoor and indoor environmental quality. These measures (Title 24, Part 6) are listed in the California Code of Regulations. The California Energy Commission is responsible for adopting, implementing and updating building energy efficiency. Local city and county enforcement agencies have the authority to verify compliance with applicable building codes, including energy efficiency.” 

ASHRAE 189.1: “Standard 189.1 provides total building sustainability guidance for designing, building, and operating high-performance green buildings. From site location to energy use to recycling, this standard sets the foundation for green buildings by addressing site sustainability, water use efficiency, energy efficiency, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and the building’s impact on the atmosphere, materials and resources.”

ASHRAE Handbook: See the following chapters focus on duct design and construction:

  • 02 Fundamentals | 21 Duct Design
  • 02 HVAC Systems and Equipment | 19 Duct Construction

SMACNA HVAC Duct Construction Standards, 4th edition: Read about this code update for duct tightness that went into review last year. Anticipation is building for what’s next.

IECC 2018: With the typical time difference between code development and code adoption being three years, watch for many builders and building code authorities to adopt IECC 2012/2015.

Want to learn more about the changing and growing building codes? We’ve got a couple upcoming free webinars you might like.

First, commercial sheet metal business experts John Hauser and Mike McCarthy from Eastern Metalworks will be discussing their experiences in the sheet metal industry, synergies of duct sealing for sheet metal businesses, and more on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 at 1:30pm ET (10:30am PT). Learn More at www.aeroseal.com/success-series-webinar-2/

Second, BPI Technical Director John Jones will be sharing insights into cracking the new codes for residential new construction on Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 3:00pm ET (12:00pm PT). Learn More at www.aeroseal.com/res/2018-webinar-series/building-codes/

Source: Aeroseal

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

American Dental Association Improves Ventilation, Meets Code with Aeroseal

For the past decade, Mike Kosinski and his team of experts at CEPro Inc. have been taking great care of the historic ADA building on Chicago’s Near North Side. Built in 1965, the 23-story skyscraper has undergone numerous upgrades and renovations, but none as transformative as those being planned for the building’s 4th-floor medical laboratory. Unfortunately, leaks in risers that connect the labs fume hoods to two rooftop fans were making adequate ventilation impossible. Not able to meet stringent exhaust code specification, some of the fume hoods were simply rendered inoperable. Without a solution to the problem, laboratory renovation was impractical. Talks of having to relocate the entire facility had begun to surface.

Each of the building risers were actually encased in individual concrete structures that draped over the side of the building’s exterior. That meant accessing the enclosed ductwork to seal the leaks would require nothing less than major building demolition. With no alternative, the leaks continued to plague the facility.

In Brief

  • Building: American Dental Association Building
  • Location: Chicago, Illinois
  • Building Managers: CEPro Inc.
  • Aeroseal Contractor: Airways Systems Inc.
  • Goal: Meet code for proper lab fume hood operations
  • Before Aeroseal: 2,733.00 CFM of leakage
  • After Aeroseal: 606 CFM of leakage
  • Results: Aeroseal eliminated 2,127 CFM of leakage. With proper exhaust now possible, all fume hoods are back up and operational. Renovation on schedule.

That’s when CEPro’s Mike Wessel, learned about a new approach to duct sealing that worked from the inside of the duct to find and seal leaks. After initial research and explanatory meetings with building management, Wessel got the go-ahead for a preliminary duct-sealing project. Airways Systems’ Joe St. Pierre got the call and soon, he and his team arrived on site to seal 3 of the leaky shafts.

When finished, the print out report generated by the Aeroseal system provided immediate results – Aeroseal reduced leakage by as much as 94.5%. A week later, Joe got the go ahead to seal the rest of the leaky shafts. In the end, Joe and his team reduced leakage by more than 2,000 CFM, more than enough to meet code and get all fume hoods up and operational. Renovation of the ADA lab is back on the schedule and moving forward.

Testimonial

My story is simple. I was skeptical that the Aerosealing would work. I watched the process and found it magical because it was so simple. And in the end, we went from having doubting clients to having customers that were gleeful and happy, bristling with excitement because their life just got infinitely easier.”

There was simply no other practical solution. If not for the Aeroseal, we would be moving the lab right now, incurring millions of dollars to change strategy and writing off millions in investment that had already been made in the building. Aeroseal extended the life of their investment – I can’t even estimate the total cost savings this represents.”

Michael Wessel
Project Engineer
CEPro, Inc.

Source: Aeroseal

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at

1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com, for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Overview of the Air Duct Cleaning Process


NADCA members are accustomed to handling a variety of projects for commercial and industrial buildings. NADCA’s presence in the commercial HVAC industry is growing steadily as education about our members’ services grows. It is becoming increasingly common for project proposals to specify the presence of an ASCS certified individual on a commercial job.

When hiring a NADCA member, an optimal level of performance should be expected. Technicians are required to adhere to the industry’s standards and guidelines, and inform the client of any obstacles that may prevent doing so. NADCA members are able to able to answer most questions about a particular project, including safety issues and are able to provide proof that the job has been done correctly.  

Through clear, concise communications, air duct cleaning contractors can provide their clients with a better understanding of the work to be undertaken and demonstrate that the project will be well managed. Clients should also clearly define the scope of work they desire and are encouraged to utilize NADCA’s General Specifications for the Cleaning and Restoration of Commercial Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems.

HVAC system cleaning projects require a game plan. Project length can vary from a few hours to six months or more. The size and scope of the project are the two key elements that will have an impact on the length of time necessary for completion. The entire duct cleaning project will run smoothest when an in-depth review is first conducted to determine the expectations and desired outcome for both the customer and duct cleaning company. 

  • During cleaning, the entire HVAC system is placed under continuous negative pressure — with a vacuum — to prevent the spread of contaminants.
  • Continuous negative pressure allows very fine particles to be removed from the system as they become airborne, ensuring that these particles are not released into the living space when the system is turned on after cleaning.
  • This negative pressure also serves to extract the loosened contaminants, which are collected and removed from your home.

Often, HVAC system components collect significant amounts of debris and particulate during construction activities within a building. NADCA recommends that newly installed HVAC systems or HVAC systems undergoing renovation be verified clean and protected before the system is permitted to operate.

Source: From NADCA’s “The Facility Manager’s Guide to Sick Buildings & Indoor Air Quality.”

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Contact us for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs: 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer.

Remember to Clean Your Clothes Dryer Vents

Facts about home clothes dryer fires

  • 2,900 home clothes dryer fires are reported each year and cause an estimated 5 deaths, 100 injuries, and $35 million in property loss.
  • Failure to clean the dryer (34 percent) is the leading cause of home clothes dryer fires.
  • More home clothes dryer fires occur in the fall and winter months, peaking in January.

Clothes dryer fire safety messages

It is important for community residents to know how to keep themselves safe from fire. Use the following fire safety messages to teach people about clothes dryer fire safety.

Clothes dryer do’s

Installation

  • Have your clothes dryer installed by a professional.
  • Make sure the correct electrical plug and outlet are used and that the dryer is connected properly.
  • Read manufacturers’ instructions and warnings in use and care manuals that come with new dryers.

Cleaning

  • Clean the lint filter before and after each load of laundry. Don’t forget to clean the back of the dryer where lint can build up. In addition, clean the lint filter with a nylon brush at least every six months or more often if it becomes clogged.
  • Clean lint out of the vent pipe every three months.
  • Have your dryer cleaned regularly by a professional, especially if it is taking longer than normal for clothes to dry.

Maintenance

  • Inspect the venting system behind the dryer to ensure it is not damaged or restricted.
  • Put a covering on outside wall dampers to keep out rain, snow and dirt.
  • Make sure the outdoor vent covering opens when the dryer is on.
  • Replace coiled-wire foil or plastic venting with rigid, non-ribbed metal duct.
  • Have gas-powered dryers inspected every year by a professional to ensure that the gas line and connection are together and free of leaks.
  • Check regularly to make sure nests of small animals and insects are not blocking the outside vent.
  • Keep the area around the clothes dryer free of items that can burn.
  • If you will be away from home for an extended time, unplug or disconnect the dryer.

Clothes dryer don’ts

Don’t use a clothes dryer without a lint filter or with a lint filter that is loose, damaged or clogged.

  • Don’t overload the dryer.
  • Don’t use a wire screen or cloth to cover the wall damper. They can collect lint and clog the dryer vent.
  • Don’t dry anything containing foam, rubber or plastic. An example of an item not to place in a dryer is a bathroom rug with a rubber backing.
  • Don’t dry any item for which manufacturers’ instructions state “dry away from heat.”
  • Don’t dry glass fiber materials (unless manufacturers’ instructions allow).
  • Don’t dry items that have come into contact with anything flammable like alcohol, cooking oils or gasoline. Dry them outdoors or in a well-ventilated room, away from heat.
  • Don’t leave a clothes dryer running if you leave home or when you go to bed.

Source U.S. Fire Administration (USFA)

View a video on the NADCA Dryer Exhaust Duct Performance Standard (DEDP):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFFd38O-I0M

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Contact us for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Attention builders, architects, commercial property owners and facility managers!

Have you heard how Aerobarrier can save on energy costs?

What is Aerobarrier?
Historically, energy savings derived from building envelope enhancements have been challenging to achieve. At the same time, standards for envelope tightness are escalating. AeroBarrier, a new and innovative envelope sealing technology is transforming the way residential, multifamily, and commercial buildings seal the building envelope.

AeroBarrier can help builders meet any IECC, Energy Star, or passive house requirement more consistently and more importantly, more cost-effectively than traditional envelope sealing methods. AeroBarrier is a proprietary technology that takes the guesswork out of sealing the envelope.

We guarantee the results, whether you need 3ACH50 or passive house requirements! AeroBarrier is a first of its kind, cutting-edge envelope sealing technology for commercial, residential and multi-family applications with tested and proven results.

It’s a 5-Step Process:

Step 1 – Setup Equipment


Equipment is set up at the job site. Conveniently transported by trailer, AeroBarrier install equipment is mobile and portable. The equipment includes a compressor, generator, blower door, emitters, hoses, and the AeroBarrier machine.

Step 2 – Prep the Area


Prep the space. This includes taping or covering any areas that won’t be sealed. Emitters are then set up throughout the area to be sealed.

 
Step 3 – Pressurize the Space


Pressurize the space with the use of a blower door. A computer does the rest, including the control of temperature, pressure, humidity, and distribution of sealant during the process


Step 4 – Real-time Results


See the results in real-time. Throughout the application process, the computer monitor displays the ACH improvement, allowing you full control over your desired level of envelope tightness and the leakage reduction.


Step 5 – Printed Report – Results Guaranteed

Run a final blower door test to verify the sealing results. At the end of the process, receive an AeroBarrier Certificate, with a pre and post leakage report.

The Aeroseal History

Aeroseal is a patented technology process that seals cracks and holes in new and existing air duct systems. The sealing technology was invented by Dr. Mark Modera, a scientist at the University of California, in 1994.

The technology was developed and tested by Indoor Air Quality scientists within the Indoor Environment Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

The University of California was granted patents in 1996 and 1999, and Aeroseal holds an exclusive license to the technology.

In 1997, the magic began to happen. HVAC contractors officially began using the Aeroseal technology to effectively seal air duct leaks in homes and commercial buildings, and the occupants have been noticing improved comfort, reduced dust/allergens, and lower energy/utility costs ever since.

The Aeroseal sealant has been in use for over twenty years. It is a vinyl material that is suspended in a water solutions. Once atomized, the sealant is air dried and is deposited principally at the leaks without coating the inside of the ducts.

In 2000, The Department of Energy (DOE) and its Citizen Judges selected the 100 best scientific and technological accomplishments to come out of the 23 years of the DOE’s existence. The Citizen Judges narrowed down the field to the 23 technologies that have the largest potential to save consumers money and improve their quality of life. Aeroseal duct sealing technology was selected to receive both awards.

Upon the arrival of 2017, Aeroseal made some game-changing moves. It celebrated its 20th anniversary and after 4 years of research and development announced its new product AeroBarrier, its breakthrough envelope sealing technology. AeroBarrier, licensed from the University of California at Davis after years of testing by the California Energy Commission and the US Department of Energy, is a cutting-edge envelope sealing technology for commercial, residential and multi-family applications with tested and proven results.

See how Aeroseal works in commercial projects:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heLz6bR_uYw

Contact Us!

We love hearing from Builders, Architects, and others who are interested in AeroBarrier.

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Contact us for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Infographic: 5 Game-Changing Facts About Air Ducts


A new study from the Center for Energy and Environment (CEE) examining the viability of duct sealing in commercial buildings, revealed several criteria that could be used to help identify buildings most likely to realize significant energy and cost saving benefits from air duct sealing. The study also concluded that aerosol-based duct sealing proved more effective and produced a faster return on investment (ROI) as compared to traditional duct sealing methods, particularly when access to ductwork was limited.


Highlights of the study,
Duct Leakage and Retrofit Duct Sealing in Minnesota Commercial and Institutional Buildings, have been developed into a newinfographic: “5 Game-Changing Facts About Air Ducts,” which is available for download on the Aeroseal website. The study and the infographic will be presented by CEE Senior Research Engineer, Josh Quinnell, Ph.D., at a joint webinar scheduled for March 29, 2018 at 1:30pm EDT.

Duct leakage can result in a major hit on buildings’ energy use and cause a substantial increase in operating costs,” said Quinnell. “Our study identified key criteria to pinpoint those buildings that are most likely to experience leakage, and consequently benefit the most from duct sealing.”

The four criteria that can be helpful in identifying buildings with the biggest potential for energy savings include:

  • System Type: Exhaust systems, especially those traversing unconditioned space; supply systems located in ceiling plenum returns; or supply systems with fully ducted returns.
  • Operating Pressure: Operating pressure of at least 0.5” w.g. are acceptable, above 1.0” w.g. are preferred.
  • Design Flow: Design flows greater than 4,000 cfm are acceptable, greater than 10,000 cfm are preferred.
  • Apparent Tightness: Systems with existing sealant and systems of apparently tight construction (i.e. spiral) are less likely to have substantial leakage.

The study also found that aerosol-based duct sealing was typically more effective than traditional duct sealing (tape / mastic), especially when the ducts were insulated or access to the entire duct system was limited. “Using Aeroseal technology, the median sealing rate was 86% and often reduced effectively to zero – among the highest energy conservation rates we’ve studied,” said Quinnell. “Our study predicts an average ROI of around seven years, achieved by first identifying the buildings best suited for sealing and then using the Aerosol sealing process to do the work.”

Source: Aeroseal

For more information:
Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning, an approved Aeroseal Dealer, at 1-800-931-6653 or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI). Contact us for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs.

Watch the video on how Aeroseal works: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heLz6bR_uYw

Why Clean Air Ducts? Answer: Because They Get Dirty!

In addition to normal accumulations of dust and dirt found in all homes with air ducts, there are several other factors that can increase the need for regular HVAC system cleaning:

Pets
• Occupants with allergies or asthma
• Cigarette or cigar smoke
• Water contamination or damage to the home or HVAC system
• Home renovation or remodeling projects

Some occupants are more sensitive to these contaminants than others. Allergy and asthma sufferers, as well as young children and the elderly tend to be more susceptible to the types of poor indoor air quality that air duct cleaning can help address.

Top Benefits of HVAC Cleaning

NADCA’s rule of thumb for consumers is that “if your air ducts look dirty, they probably are,” and that dirty HVAC systems should be inspected by a reputable, certified HVAC professional. Below are some other reasons homeowners choose to have their air ducts cleaned.

Indoor Air Quality

Indoor air quality is one concern that homeowners have when they decide to investigate air duct cleaning. Your heating and cooling system is the lungs of your home. The system takes air in and breathes air out.

Through normal occupation in a home, we generate a great deal of contaminants and air pollutants, such as dander, dust, and chemicals. These contaminants are pulled into the HVAC system and re-circulated 5 to 7 times per day, on average. Over time, this re-circulation causes a build-up of contaminants in the duct work.

While dirty ducts don’t necessarily mean unhealthy air in your home, school or workplace, they may be contributing to larger health issues or harboring contaminants that could cause serious problems for people with respiratory health conditions, autoimmune disorders or some environmental allergies.

Energy Savings

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, 25 to 40 percent of the energy used for heating or cooling a home is wasted. Contaminants in the heating and cooling system cause it to work harder and shorten the life of your system. Although filters are used, the heating and cooling system still gets dirty through normal use.

When an HVAC system is clean, it doesn’t have to work as hard to maintain the temperature you desire. As a result, less energy is used, leading to improved cost-effectiveness.

See what’s involved with your air ducts. Watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rh1JspTY2uU

Source: National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA)

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is licensed and ensured, a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), and an approved Aeroseal Dealer.

Aeroseal Sparks Trend in NY High-Rise Retrofitting

Sealing from the inside allows engineers to fix ventilation in older buildings where access is limited, resulting in lower energy costs and improved IAQ.

Like most older buildings throughout the United States, the Carlyle Towers in Caldwell, New Jersey suffered from poor ventilation. Leaks in the duct work prevented the huge rooftop fans from effectively drawing air out of the many bathrooms, hallways and living spaces within the 55-year-old multi-family apartment building. Limited access to the duct work made manual duct sealing methods impossible without severe demolition to the building’s walls and ceilings.

Several years ago, the engineers at Steven Winters Associates decided to tackle the problem using a new technology developed by the U.S. Department of Energy that seals leaks from the inside of the duct work. The success of that project has resulted in the technology’s use to solve similar ventilation issues in thousands of apartments throughout the New York City area alone.

In Brief

  • Building: Carlyle Towers apartment building
  • Location: West Caldwell, New Jersey
  • Property Owners: Legow Management
  • Engineering Contractor: Steven Winters Assoc.
  • Goal: Improve ventilation, lower energy costs, improve indoor air quality and HVAC comfort
  • Before Aeroseal: 250 CFM average leakage/shaft
  • After Aeroseal: 15 CFM average leakage/shaft
  • Results: 90% reduction in leakage; $26,000/year energy savings; even room-to-room comfort. 

It took engineers just 4 weeks to Aeroseal all 25 of the building’s individual ventilation shafts. With the leaks sealed and the pressure within the shafts balanced, contractors were able to replace the 25 300-watt roof exhaust fans with 140-watt units. The fan optimization alone resulted in an annual energy savings of $7,000. In addition, the improved HVAC efficiency afforded by the leak-free ductwork decreased gas use by approximately 30% – from an average of 57,000 therms (EC)/year to 41,000 therms (EC)/year for an additional savings of approximately $19,000 annually.

Since the completion of the Carlyle Towers retrofit project, hundreds of similar New York-area multi-family apartments with central ventilation have been similarly retrofitted for higher energy performance.

Testimonials

Soon after the retrofit was completed, we heard from tenants who thanked the building manager for fixing the heat. While we didn’t touch the heating system per se, by sealing the shaft leaks and automating the damper adjustments, the furnace was noticeably more efficient and effective” (David Legow, President, Legow Management).

Aeroseal sealed on average 90% of the duct leakage, and that had a significant impact on the ability to properly balance ventilation and reduced the use of both gas and electricity” (Marc Zuluaga, Vice President, Steven Winters Associates).

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

The Facility Manager’s Guide to Sick Buildings and Indoor Air Quality

 

Overview of the Cleaning Process

NADCA members are accustomed to handling a variety of projects for commercial and industrial buildings. NADCA’s presence in the commercial HVAC industry is growing steadily as education about our members’ services grows. It is becoming increasingly common for project proposals to specify the presence of an ASCS certified individual on a commercial job.

When hiring a NADCA member, an optimal level of performance should be expected. Technicians are required to adhere to the industry’s standards and guidelines, and inform the client of any obstacles that may prevent doing so. NADCA members are able to able to answer most questions about a particular project, including safety issues and are able to provide proof that the job has been done correctly.  

Through clear, concise communications, air duct cleaning contractors can provide their clients with a better understanding of the work to be undertaken and demonstrate that the project will be well managed. Clients should also clearly define the scope of work they desire and are encouraged to utilize NADCA’s General Specifications for the Cleaning and Restoration of Commercial Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems.

HVAC system cleaning projects require a game plan. Project length can vary from a few hours to six months or more. The size and scope of the project are the two key elements that will have an impact on the length of time necessary for completion. The entire duct cleaning project will run smoothest when an in-depth review is first conducted to determine the expectations and desired outcome for both the customer and duct cleaning company. 

  • During cleaning, the entire HVAC system is placed under continuous negative pressure — with a vacuum — to prevent the spread of contaminants.
  • Continuous negative pressure allows very fine particles to be removed from the system as they become airborne, ensuring that these particles are not released into the living space when the system is turned on after cleaning.
  • This negative pressure also serves to extract the loosened contaminants, which are collected and removed from your home.

Often, HVAC system components collect significant amounts of debris and particulate during construction activities within a building. NADCA recommends that newly installed HVAC systems or HVAC systems undergoing renovation be verified clean and protected before the system is permitted to operate.

Introduction to HVAC System Cleaning Services

This short booklet provides commercial HVAC system cleaning consumers with the information needed to understand the procedures used by NADCA members. It outlines the inspection, maintenance and restoration of commercial HVAC systems. This publication also covers tips for selecting a qualified contractor and managing successful projects.

Source: National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA)

View the video: NADCA ACR Standard
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNaxPr6gPSg

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

 

Dust and Allergies in Your Home

Pollen, dust mites, mold, animal dander and other contaminates are common allergy triggers.  There is not much you can do about pollen or dust outside of your home but when you’re indoors nothing is worse than having that month long runny nose during the fall or mold allergies in the spring.

When you have leaky ductwork in your home you can expect with 100% certainty that these common contaminates are in there with you.

 

Dust and allergies in your home may be caused by Duct Leaks

Do you notice substantial dust in your home?

Ductwork is typically run through attics, crawlspaces, basements or even behind walls.  When you have leaks in your ductwork, they will suck air from these spaces into your living areas.

By sealing your ductwork you can limit the entrance points of your home that allow dust, pollen, or mold into your home and insure a much cleaner & healthier environment.

Homeowners who seal their ductwork with Aeroseal experience less dust and allergies in their homes!

Aeroseal Helps Solve Your Indoor Allergy Problems

Take a couple seconds to watch how Aeroseal fixes duct leaks!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3JAR0dCNhc

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA), the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), and the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.