Holiday Safety Tips


Because we at Aspen Air Duct Cleaning care about our customers, we’d like to say Happy Thanksgiving and share this list of holiday safety tips provided by the National Safety Council.

Holiday Safety Tips

Decorating Safety ™

 Never use lighted candles near trees, boughs, curtains/drapes, or with any potentially flammable item. 

 Wear gloves while decorating with spun glass “angel hair.” It can irritate your eyes and skin. A common substitute is non-flammable cotton. 

 When spraying artificial snow on windows or other surfaces, be sure to follow directions carefully. These sprays can irritate your lungs if you inhale them. 

Small children may think that holiday plants look good enough to eat, but many plants may be poisonous or can cause severe stomach problems. Plants to watch out for include: mistletoe, holly berries, Jerusalem cherry and amaryllis. Keep all of these plants out of children’s reach. 

 When displaying a tree, cut off about two inches off the trunk and put the tree in a sturdy, water-holding stand. Keep the stand filled with water so the tree does not dry out quickly. 

 Stand your tree away from fireplaces, radiators and other heat sources. Make sure the tree does not block foot traffic or doorways. 

 Avoid placing breakable tree ornaments or ones with small, detachable parts on lower branches where small children or pets can reach them. 

 If you use an artificial tree, choose one that is tested and labeled as fire resistant. Artificial trees with built-in electrical systems should have the Underwriters Laboratory (UL) label. 

 Only use indoor lights indoors (and outdoor lights only outdoors). Look for the UL label. Check lights for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, and loose connections. Replace or repair any damaged light sets. 

 Use no more than three light sets on any one extension cord. Extension cords should be placed against the wall to avoid tripping hazards, but do not run cords under rugs, around furniture legs or across doorways. 

 Turn off all lights on trees and decorations when you go to bed or leave the house. Unplug extension cords when not in use. 

 If using a natural tree, make sure it is well watered to avoid dry branches from catching fire from the heat of light bulbs.  When displaying outdoor lights, fasten them firmly to a secure support with insulated staples or hooks to avoid wind damage. Never nail, tack or stress wiring when hanging lights and keep plugs off the ground away from puddles and snow.

Ladder Safety ™

 When putting up holiday decorations, always use the proper step stool or ladder to reach high places. Don’t stand on chairs, desks or other furniture. 

 If you have to use a step ladder near a doorway, lock or barricade the door and post signs so no one will open it and knock you off the ladder. 

 A straight or extension ladder should be placed one foot away from the surface it rests against for every four feet of ladder height. 

 When you climb, always face the ladder and grip the rungs to climb – not the side rails. Always keep three points of contact on the ladder whether two hands and one foot, or two feet and one hand. 

 When climbing, keep your hips between the side rails and do not lean too far or overreach. Reposition the ladder closer to the work instead. 

 Use ladders with slip-resistant feet and wear clean, dry and slip-resistant shoes when climbing a ladder. 

 When using ladders outdoors, get down immediately if high winds, rain, snow or other inclement weather begins. Winds can blow you off the ladder and rain or snow can make both the rungs and the ground slippery.

Hosting and Food Safety ™

 When preparing a holiday meal for friends and family be sure to wash hands, utensils, sink, and anything else that has come in contact with raw poultry. Keep in mind that a stuffed bird takes longer to cook. 

 Never defrost food at room temperature. Thaw it in the refrigerator, in cold water or in the microwave. 

 While doing holiday cooking, keep your knives sharp. Most knife injuries occur due to dull blades. 

 Use a clean food thermometer to cook foods to a safe internal temperature before serving. 

 Avoid cleaning kitchen surfaces with wet dishcloths or sponges. They easily harbor bacteria and promote bacteria growth. Use clean paper towels instead.  When reheating leftovers, bring the temperature up to at least 165°F to eliminate any bacterial growth. 

 Refrigerate or freeze leftovers in covered shallow containers (less than two inches deep) within two hours after cooking. Date the leftovers for future use. • Being a smart party host or guest should include being sensible about alcoholic drinks. More than half of all traffic fatalities are alcohol-related. Use designated drivers, people who do not drink, to drive other guests home after a holiday party. 

 The holiday season is one of the most stressful times of the year. You can’t avoid stress completely, but you can give yourself some relief. Allow enough time to shop for gifts and meal items rather than hurry through stores and parking lots. Only plan to do a reasonable number of errands.

Winter Vehicle Preparation ™

 Prepare your car for the winter by checking items such as the brakes, spark plugs, battery, and tires. Check your owner’s manual for the recommended interval for a tune-up. ™

 Be prepared for emergency situations on the road by having a winter “survival kit” in the vehicle including items such as, a working flashlight, extra batteries, reflective triangles, compass, first aid kit, exterior windshield cleaner, ice scraper, snow brush, wooden stick matches in a waterproof container, and non-perishable, high energy foods like unsalted canned nuts, dried fruits, and hard candy.

Source: The National Safety Council

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

 

 

 

Attention: Builders and Contractors Announcing a Brand New Envelope Sealing Technology!

• MEET the most aggressive air leakage standards
• MEET passive house air tightness standards
• ACHIEVE air tightness requirements in less time and without costly delays
• ELIMINATE noise and odor complaints by simultaneously sealing exterior and interior walls
MEET MORE STRINGENT IECC CODE REQUIREMENTS that are forcing builders to change the way they build their homes—comply with ASTM E2357, ASTM E2178, and NFPA 285.

What Is Aerobarrier?
Building upon proven technology invented by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 20 years ago, AeroBarrier is a cutting edge aerosol envelope sealing system that simultaneously measures and seals building
envelope air leaks.

See How It Works:

                                     It’s Envelope Sealing Made Easy!

Aerobarrier is a cutting-edge technology that takes the guesswork out of sealing the building envelope. Our goal was to provide a more cost-effective way to meet the most aggressive air tightness standards compared to standard, manual sealing methods

“The AeroBarrier process has the potential to be more effective and convenient than conventional sealing methods because it requires less time and effort, and it can seal a larger portion of a leakage area more quickly.”

AeroBarrier simultaneously measures and seals the building envelope with guaranteed results. Whether you need to meet the latest IECC code or passive house requirements, from new construction to gut renovations in single and multi-family spaces, the technology works.

• MEET any air leakage requirement without changing the way the house is built.
• SEAL an entire house in half a day to whatever tightness is required?
• USE the same process for both multi and single-family construction.
• PROVIDE more energy efficient homes to all your customers.

About Aspen:
Aspen professionals are licensed and insured and members of the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI), the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA), and the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC), and we are an approved Aerosea/Aerobarrier Dealer.

Please contact Aspen Environmental Services for professional mold testing and removal, and water damage restoration at (978) 681-5023.

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection, and to learn more about Aeroseal air duct sealing and Aerobarrier envelope sealing technology.

 

Five Things Smart Buildings Have in Common

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More and more “smart” commercial buildings are being built these days. And, no, we don’t mean Ivy League smart. The term “smart building” instead refers to network-enabled building management systems that help automate building operations, with the goal of saving energy and $$.

A recent article in Forbes stated recently, “These technologies, once considered revolutionary, are steadily becoming the norm in today’s premier office buildings.” The site listed five specific examples of web-enabled smart building features that can make a big impact on an office environment:

  • Optimized HVAC systems
  • Managed electricity reductions
  • Maximized building security
  • Smart sensors for lighting
  • Controlled appliances from remote locations

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Optimized HVAC is listed first, as well it should be. Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) has the most impact on building performance, comfort and energy efficiency.  A recent case study in Facility Executive magazine on HVAC optimization described how to use advanced software to control factors such as “water flows, pump speeds and fan speeds while maintaining set temperatures.” In fact, for many buildings, manually heating and cooling individual offices can account for over one-third of a building’s entire water consumption.

In the example showcased, a 220,000-square-foot office building operating around the clock used 2,200 tons of cooling power. When it switched to a network-based HVAC system that automatically calculated the best ways to heat, cool and ventilate based on the time of day, the building saved 364,921 gallons of water per year.

Duct Leakage Can Impact Optimization

But beware… HVAC systems (smart or otherwise) are only as good as the ductwork supplying them. Leaky ductwork can thwart even the smartest, high-efficiency systems, and cause excessive energy waste. In fact one of the smartest universities around, Harvard, found this to be true when it installed a brand new 8,500 CFM air handling unit to supply heating and AC to its Girguis Lab, one of the most famed buildings on campus.

When the HVAC unit was brought online, its fan was operating at around 97% of capacity with little effect. It was determined that leaks in the ductwork were reducing static pressure to such a degree that air couldn’t reach its destinations. With ducts hidden under insulation and behind layers of pipes, fixing those leaks seemed an impossible task.

Fortunately, the mechanical contractors on the job had heard about Aeroseal duct sealing from the inside. Local Boston Aeroseal expert Aspen Air Duct Cleaning was called in and just a matter of days, the problem was fixed. Leakage was reduced from more than 5,800 CFM down to 429 CFM –  a 98% reduction. The fan now operated at only 37% of capacity. The system was quieter, and university engineers were relieved. Now, that’s smart!

Click here to read the full Harvard case study:

https://aeroseal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Case-Study-Harvard-vF.pdf

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

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8 Low- and No-Cost Ways to Save Energy in Buildings

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In an article appearing in a recent issue of Engineering Green Buildings, a newsletter from HPAC Engineering, author Kenneth M. Elovitz identifies several “low-hanging fruit” ideas for budget-minded facility managers looking to cut costs associated with energy use in commercial buildings.

As the author points out, new building projects provide energy-saving opportunities related to design and construction. Existing buildings, however, have a variety of low- and no-cost energy saving retrofit options worthy of consideration as well. Below is a summary of several ideas shared in the piece as well as one added suggestion. 

  1. Analyze Building Energy Use
  2. Reduce Water Pressure or Use Low-Flow Faucets and Showerheads
  3. Reduce Boiler Steam Pressure
  4. Repair Damaged or Missing Insulation
  5. Install Lighting Controls
  6. Consider “Smart” Power Strips
  7. Reset Hot/Chilled-Water Temperature
  8. Seal Leaky Ductwork

We couldn’t agree more with #8! Recent research by the U.S. Department of Energy, McKinsey & Company and others has shed a new spotlight on the major role that air distribution systems play in the energy efficiency of commercial buildings.

It’s not that duct leakage is anything new. It’s been around for about as long as commercial buildings themselves. But the problem has been all but ignored for one simple reason: there were no viable solutions. Few building owners were willing to undergo the demolition, disruption and expense associated with traditional duct sealing methods.

Faced with this reality, scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with funding by the U.S. DOE, the EPA, and others, focused efforts on finding an answer. They were determined to develop a viable, cost-effective way to seal energy-robbing leaks that currently exist in the miles of ductwork hidden behind the infrastructure of today’s buildings.

The result of their efforts was a new technology that offers a completely different approach to duct sealing – a technology that works from the inside out to seal leaks. Administered as an aerosol mist that is injected and blown into the inside of ductwork or ventilation shafts, the sealing technology can quickly and non-disruptively seal leaks throughout the entire duct system.

In 2008, Steven Winters Associates (SWA), armed with this and other innovative air flow management technologies, began work on a project that would have engineers rethinking ventilation retrofitting and energy saving strategies. Combining these new technologies, SWA engineers completely rehabilitated the duct system of a 55-year old multi-family apartment building in West Caldwell, New Jersey, saving the building owners an estimated $29,000/year in reduced energy costs.

Following the success of this and other similar projects, the use of aerosol-based duct sealing has surged in retrofit projects around the globe. Thousands of commercial buildings – from hospitals in Dubai to condos in Australia, to schools, office buildings and hotels across the United States – have used Aeroseal technology to realize energy savings and improve the overall performance of their commercial buildings.

Now that a viable, cost-effective means of sealing duct leaks is readily available, we are also seeing a tightening of standards and a change in the rules related to energy conservation. Top government regulatory agencies and industry groups have begun to include duct sealing on the top of their list of low-cost opportunities for energy savings.

The choices for energy-saving measures (ECMs) in commercial real estate today are vast. Some cost hundreds of thousands of dollars – others little or nothing. Thanks to innovative advancements in duct sealing technology, sealing duct leaks has earned its place as a new low-hanging fruit in the arsenal of those looking to reduce the operational costs of their commercial buildings.

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is a certified Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and insured. Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for professional air duct and dryer vent inspection, cleaning, and repair. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com

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Stop the Leaks in Your Building and Improve Your Bottom Line

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A Sound Financial Decision

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Aeroseal is the most effective, affordable, and viable method of sealing duct leaks. Just like anywhere else, ducts in commercial buildings leak. Leaking ducts cost you money via:

  • Increased Energy Consumption – With fan power representing 40-50% of HVAC energy usage, leakage costs can be significant due to increases in fan speed to compensate for leakage; even 15% leakage can lead to an increase in system fan power of 40%
  • Thermal Loss – When supply air escapes, variations in temperature between rooms and floors occur affecting comfort levels in this space
  • Equipment Overload – Your system will run longer than specified to compensate for pressure loss and temperature accuracy; this could lead to increased maintenance costs and premature component replacement
  • Code Issues – Leakage could lead to ventilation and safety code issues relating to exhaust, along with excessive fan power use
  • Airflow Safety – For hospitals, laboratories and manufacturing facilities, the unexpected spread of contaminants and biohazards through back drafting could pose a liability

The computerized duct system inspection performed by Aeroseal will illustrate not only the building leakage percentage, but also the impact that sealing the leaks can have on your company’s bottom line. Using local utility rates, estimated system operating hours, and other inputs supplied by your operations personnel, our software closely calculates all the financial parameters of the project including:

  • Simple payback
  • Benefit-to-cost ratio and ROI

Let us help you secure increased comfort and air quality in your building as your company saves money. Contact your Aeroseal professionals today and we’ll investigate and locate the hidden problem areas in your duct system. We’ll properly diagnose your system and provide you with a cost-effective, state-of-the-art solution to your duct issues that can save you huge capital and manpower expenditures. Aeroseal seals up the leaks. And the wasted money and hazards of faulty ductwork.

Reduce Your Energy and Ventilation Problems

Are you looking for ways to reduce your building’s energy costs, improve indoor air quality (IAQ), fix your venting issues and extend equipment life? Get a good start by taking a closer look at your ductwork. According to the US Department of Energy, a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory study found that the leakage rates of commercial buildings exceed the ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) recommended classes by an average of 20 percent. Both new and old commercial buildings exhibit duct system problems including:

  • Increased airflow due to duct leakage
  • Improperly installed duct sealants
  • Damaged sealants: thermal pressure and temperature cycling can damage sealants – especially the rubber-based adhesive found in duct tape -increasing leakage over time

But there’s a simple solution to this costly problem. You can reduce your energy and equipment repair costs resulting from compromised ductwork with the most advanced duct sealing in the industry – Aeroseal Certified Duct Diagnostics and Sealing.

How Does Aeroseal Work?

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The patented Aeroseal duct-sealing technology is an effective and affordable method of sealing ductwork systems within commercial buildings. The Aeroseal duct sealing process begins and ends by conducting a thorough diagnostic test of the duct system. The process works like this:

The diffusers are temporarily blocked while sealant is blown throughout the duct system. Pressure maintained within the system causes the air to accelerate as it exits through the leaks. The Aeroseal particles build up to span and seal the holes – up to 5/8 of an inch – without coating the ductwork. Aeroseal effectively seals ductwork from the inside out by using UL-tested and approved sealing material.

At the conclusion of the process, the diagnostic test is performed again summarizing your building’s amount of leakage reduction to ensure Aeroseal was successful.

Additionally, the Department of Energy declared Aeroseal as one of the most beneficial energy technologies for American consumers.

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

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AEROSEAL KEY TO $37,000 ANNUAL ENERGY SAVINGS FOR NEW JERSEY HIGH-RISE

Energy Auditors Specify The Use Of Aeroseal To Increase Energy Efficiency And Reduce Duct Leakage by Up to 95%

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Owners of Northgate II, a Section 8 community in Camden, New Jersey, were looking to reduce energy costs associated with its 308-unit apartment high-rise. To receive upgrade funding through the State’s Multifamily Weatherization Assistance Program, they had to prove that upgrades would result in substantial energy savings and a payback period of ten years or less. Energy auditors brought in to evaluate and recommend an effective course of action specified changes be made to the building’s electrical and mechanical systems.
They also insisted that Aeroseal be used to seal leaks throughout the high-rise’s entire duct system.

In Brief
Property Managers: Fair Share Development
Project Contractors: McDonald Building Co.
Property Name: Northgate II
Type: Section 8, 23-story high-rise, 308 units
Goal: Reduce energy usage by 15% or more
Before Aeroseal: Average energy leakage: 971 CFM*
After Aeroseal: Average 83% reduction in CFM loss
Cost savings: $34,000/year from reduced exhaust fan usage. An additional $3,000/year from increased heating efficiency.
Payback: 3-4 years.
*Cubic feet per minute

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An initial audit of the 23-story high rise’s ductwork showed that there were thousands of leaks throughout the building’s exhaust system. As a result, the two large fans used to draw stale air out of each of the individual apartments consumed a lot of energy to do its job. By effectively sealing the leaks with Aeroseal and updating the system’s dampers, the fans’ energy use was reduced by more than 217,000 kw/hours – a savings of more than $34,000 a year in electricity. Building owners also achieved an additional $3,000 a year in savings through more effective heating.

Quotes

“Preliminary testing revealed fairly large gaps throughout the building’s vertical exhaust ducts. The Aeroseal process fixed that problem and in doing so, significantly improved the efficiency of the building’s two exhaust fans. Aeroseal technology played a significant role in helping reduce energy consumption and ultimately meeting the requirements of the State’s Weatherization Assistance Program.”
John Ambrose, McDonald Building Company

“Our multi-family building specialists have a keen interest in ventilation systems and the wasted energy that often results from leaky ductwork. Through our ongoing experience with Aeroseal technology we’ve come to including the Aeroseal process as a standard recommendation when leaky duct systems are a concern.”
Don Casper, energy auditor, Steven Winter Associate

       

Aeroseal – The Technology

  • Developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 1994.
  • Research for Aeroseal was partially funded by the EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy.
  • Aeroseal is the only duct sealant technology that is applied from the inside of the duct system. It is delivered as a non-toxic aerosol mist that seeks out and plugs leaks.
  • Aeroseal has proven to be 95% effective at sealing air duct leaks.

Aeroseal – The Company

  • Aeroseal LLC is a subsidiary of JMD Corporation. The company is dedicated solely to the support of its dealers and the expansion of Aeroseal technology as a primary means of residential and commercial energy conservation.
  • Aeroseal is the sole owner and licensee of Aeroseal technology.
  • Aeroseal technology was bought by Carrier Corporation in the late 1990s. In 2010, Mark Modera, the inventor of Aeroseal, with the support of private equity investors, bought the company from carrier to realize the full potential and benefits of the technology. This lead to the launch of Aeroseal LLC in 2011.

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

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INNOVATION AND COORDINATION PROVE KEY TO FLAWLESS DUCT SEALING PROJECT AT NEW YORK STATE MEDICAL CENTER

Hospital Undergoes Energy-Saving Retrofit
Without Disruption To Facility’s Daily Operations

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A good ESCO is always on the lookout for new ways to save clients money.
Assessing operating budgets, reviewing overall building performance and
evaluating energy usage are just par for the course, as ongoing attempts are made to identify cost-saving options. And that means keeping abreast of innovations in building science that may lead to new energy-saving opportunities.

So when the manager of a large ESCO first sat down with Bobby Seals, Aeroseal’s director of national accounts, to discuss the energy-saving
strategies being implemented at a major New York State medical center, he had
already heard about Aeroseal technology and its unique approach to duct sealing. In fact, the company had already successfully used Aeroseal to seal ductwork and reduce energy waste during other building improvement projects, but this facility was a whole different ball game.

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Aeroseal came to New York and did a preliminary analysis of the 100+ year-old medical center. The manager was aware that the hospital had air flow issues, and that indicated targets for potential energy savings. Now the question was how much savings would Aerosealing the ductwork provide and how viable would it be to do the work in a 24/7 hospital environment.
To ensure an accurate estimate would allow facility management to confidently forecast energy savings, Aeroseal used a proprietary modeling system that incorporates a number of extenuating factors (Figure 1). After a close and thorough inspection of the duct systems and sample static pressure testing, Aeroseal had the raw data they needed to make its calculations.

IN BRIEF
Building: Hospital / healthcare facility
Where: State of New York
Sealing Consultants: Aeroseal LLC
Objective: Reduce duct leakage for substantial energy savings
Before Leakage Rate: 29,836 CFM
After Leakage Rate: 870 CFM
Reduction: 28,966 CFM
Percentage: 97% reduction
Annual Savings: $22,694

“The veracity of Aeroseal’s energy model and the leakage rates they were able to obtain through computerized testing gave us confidence that the estimated savings would be on target. Watching the process, we felt it was less about typical guesswork as it was about experienced testing and extrapolations – and it was backed up with a guarantee that we would get the level of ROI estimated by the final calculations.”
– ESCO/facility management

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Armed with this detailed information, the facility manager approached the medical center’s administrators with a recommendation that they Aeroseal five separate duct systems within the facility. It was now up to Aeroseal to convince everyone involved that the work could be done with minimal interruption to the facility’s day-to-day operations.

“Energy savings is only part of the equation. We want to consider any project that will provide a sufficient return on investment, but before we commit to a project, we need to also consider its logistical ramifications. Clearly, the level of disruption or issues that may compromise the health or safety of our patients or staff can put an immediate halt to any project.”
– Facility Director

Over the course of several meetings, Aeroseal shared details about the Aerosealing process with both facility management and hospital staff. The hospital’s administrators reviewed MSDS documents that confirmed the innocuous nature of the sealant. They also reviewed a number of case studies that Aeroseal provided of other medical facilities where the Aeroseal technology was used. With their client’s approval to move forward, facility management gave Aeroseal the green light to proceed.

Preparation
Over the next few months, the Aeroseal experts conducted research on the facility’s mechanical systems, constructed a plan of attack and consulted with hospital personnel.

Using Aeroseal technology to seal the ductwork had a number of significant advantages over traditional duct sealing methods. Applied as an aerosol mist, the sealant is blown into the interior of ductwork that has been temporarily segmented into specific sections.

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Rather than coating the entire inside walls of the ducts, the sealant particles remain suspended in air until they are drawn to the various leaks. The particles then stick to the edge of the leak and then to other particles until the entire hole is completely filled from the inside.

One of the biggest advantages to this approach is that it makes the entire duct system easy to access. Sealing from the inside-out eliminates the need to tear down walls, expose ceilings or tear off insulation in order to access the leaks. Not only does this account for the highly effective nature of Aerosealing when compared to tape or mastic, but it also eliminates the majority of disruptions associated with traditional duct sealing activity. In the hospital environment, minimizing the risks associated with such structural demolition was key.

“Making sure everyone – from administrators, to doctors and other hospital staff were comfortable with what we were doing, was vital to ensuring everything went smoothly. Once everyone understood the process, a day-to-day schedule was developed.” – Aeroseal contractor

Hospital staff from each unit involved knew when and where the work was taking place well in advance of any activity. They received continual updates throughout the project and were kept abreast of any new developments that might have arisen. Effective and ongoing communication with the administration and the facility managers as well as the staff was imperative to the project’s success.

Results
The sealing process itself took just fourteen days to complete. At the end of the project, Aeroseal provided facility management with a detailed report of the results. Data taken before, during and after the sealing project showed an original leakage rate of 29,836 CFM (cubic feet per minute) now down to a low 870 CFM. This represented a 97% reduction—4% more than the originally modeled estimate. Based upon the report provided by Aeroseal, the facility manager was able to show his clients an annual cost savings of $22,694, based upon reduced air loss and lower fan speeds. Payback for the project would be well under seven years.

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Aside from cost savings, the sealing process provided immediate improvements to the comfort level within the building. Doctors and other staff members commented on the positive change that the Aerosealing had on ventilation and temperature control.

Equally important to the success of the project, was the Aeroseal team’s ability to meet the highly individual needs of the medical center.

“There were two primary things that made this project such a success. First, flexibility. The Aeroseal team knew they couldn’t just come in and shut down equipment or section off the hospital to get their work done. Second, was planning. The preparation put into this project before the sealing even began was extraordinary and reflected the team’s understanding of the special requirements demanded by this unique environment. All of the advantages of the technology itself, implemented by a team that understood and met the unique requirements of a hospital environment made this a tremendous success.” – ESCO/Facility director

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

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Aeroseal Frequently Asked Questions

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Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI). Following are some of our most frequently asked questions.

Aeroseal Frequently Asked Questions

Why should ducts in commercial buildings be sealed?  How much energy does the sealing process save?  How does Aeroseal work?  These are the questions we hear a lot and you’ll find the answers below.  If you have any other questions please do not hesitate to contact us – we’re here to help!

Why should ducts in commercial buildings be sealed?
Duct sealing in commercial buildings cost-effectively saves energy, improves air balance and thermal distribution (comfort and ventilation), and helps comply with building codes and specification for air distribution effectiveness.

How much energy does the sealing process save?
Energy savings are different for each building and HVAC system and obviously depend upon the initial air duct tightness. The Aeroseal Energy Savings Excel spreadsheet can be used to estimate the savings for most types of buildings.

In smaller commercial buildings with air ducts outside the insulation barrier of the building, energy savings can be as much as 30% of HVAC energy use. In large buildings Aeroseal duct sealing can reduce fan-system energy use by as much as 40% and reduce heating and cooling costs by as much as 10%.

As a rough estimate, simple paybacks typically range from 3 to 7 years. In some cases building owners have recovered the investment in Aeroseal duct sealing in less than 18 months.

Is the sealant used in Aeroseal safe?
The sealant material has been certified to UL1381, the industry standard for aerosol duct sealants. It is tested to rigorous requirements for flammability, smoke inhibition, mold growth and durability. The sealant has no OSHA Exposure Limit and no special precautions are required during application. It cures in less than two hours and meets LEED requirements for low VOC emissions.

The dried sealant material is primarily vinyl acetate polymer (VAP), which has been used in chewing gums, latex paints and hair sprays.

How long will the seals last?
The sealant has a life of over 30 years. Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory tested the performance of Aeroseal seals for 4 years under accelerated conditions, and were never able to observe a failure. This corresponds to 100,000 cycles under more severe temperatures and pressures than are found in duct systems.

How do I know if the ducts in my building need to be sealed?
The duct leaks can be uncovered several ways. Aeroseal has developed a simple survey (link) that can accurately predict if an air distribution system is leaking excessively. Another method is to review a Test and Balance Report and compare the flow at the HVAC system supply or return fans and sum of the flows measures at the supply diffusers or return grilles. Testing a sample of duct sections for leakage is an accurate way to identify if ducts are too leaky. Aeroseal technicians regularly perform this test.

How does the Aeroseal process work?
The Aeroseal process seals duct leaks from the inside, using small sealant particles that deposit at the leaks without coating the interior of the duct system.

This is accomplished by pressurizing the duct system with a fog of sealant particles sized to stay suspended in the air until they try to exit the duct system. By blocking all of the intentional openings in the duct system (i.e., diffusers or grilles), all of the sealant-laden air is forced out through to the leaks. As the duct pressure causes the particles to accelerate through the leaks, they stick to the edge and build upon each other until the leaks are sealed. By constantly monitoring the duct pressure and flow, the process-control computer calculates and the displays the remaining leakage in real time. When the sealing is finished, a complete minute-by-minute record of the process is printed, stored on the local computer, and then uploaded over the internet for archival on the Aeroseal server.

How large of a leak can be sealed?
Aeroseal recommends sealing the leaks up to 5/8 inches across. Leaks more than one inch across can be sealed, however the sealing rate varies with the size of the leak times itself. In other words, the sealing time for a 1″ leak is 64 times longer than that for a leak 1/8″ across.

Practically speaking, leaks larger than about 5/8″ across are better suited to be sealed manually if possible.

What types of ducts can be sealed?
Aeroseal is capable of sealing all types of ductwork. It has been successfully applied in rigid metal and flexible air ducts. It has been applied in duct with internal insulation. It has also been installed in duct systems fabricated of ductboard, drywall or masonry blocks.

Aeroseal avoids sealing through VAV boxes or fire/smoke dampers.

What about VAV boxes and fire/smoke dampers?
Aeroseal generally avoids blowing sealant materiel through VAV boxes or fire/smoke dampers, however laboratory and field testing have shown that under the right circumstances this can be done without adverse consequences.

Under no circumstances can sealant material be blown through VAV boxes with reheat coils. Should it be more practical to blow sealant through VAV boxes or fire/smoke dampers, it is recommended to consult with the engineers at Aeroseal LLC.

Do ducts need to be cleaned prior to sealing?
Extremely dirty ducts should be cleaned.  We recommend that the technician assess the condition of ducts prior to beginning to Aeroseal process.

Can I clean my ducts if they are sealed by Aeroseal?
Ducts of all material types can be successfully cleaned after they have been sealed with Aeroseal.

Can Aeroseal be used to seal air leaks in exhaust duct systems serving Type I (grease) commercial kitchen hoods?
We do not recommend Aeroseal to seal air leaks in exhaust ducts serving commercial kitchen grease & heat removal hoods (Type I hoods).  The sealant is not listed or rated for use as a duct sealant for these types of systems, and harsh cleaning chemicals used to clean the ducts could remove or degrade the performance of any seals.

Don’t see the answer to your question? Let’s talk!

Source: Aeroseal

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

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Duct Leakage Testing is a Must

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A recent survey of the building construction industry by the Building Commissioning Association (BCA) on the issue of duct leakage resulted in some startling statistics. Seventy-five percent of the approximately 300 respondents felt that duct leakage contributes substantially to energy loss in commercial buildings. And, 74% of the respondents also believed most of the buildings in the U.S. have significant duct leakage (greater than 15%). Duct leakage can significantly increase the energy consumption of a building, leading to increased energy bills for the owner. It increases energy costs and can result in occupant discomfort and lower productivity. This combination can transform a building intended to be a high performing building into a building that is not. So, what can be done to combat duct leakage? Test early and test often.

As a commissioning provider for high performing buildings, we observe many instances of duct leakage in both new and existing buildings. The top factors for duct leakage issues are inadequate sealing of duct joints and access doors or panels, which are related to quality of duct installation workmanship, and over-pressurization of the air distribution system resulting in duct seam separation, which is related to HVAC system control. Many owners do not include commissioning, which can identify performance issues such as lack of testing requirements in the design specifications and building performance issues that occur during the design, construction, and operational phases of a project.

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Where new building codes (2010 and later) have been adopted, some duct leakage testing requirements exist. However, many states have yet to adopt the newer codes. While these new codes are beginning to require duct leakage testing, they only require 25% of the high- and medium-pressure duct be tested. As a result, duct leakage testing appears to be hit or miss when it comes to newly | Duct Leakage Testing is a Must http://www.hpbmagazine.org/Duct-Leakage-Testing-is-a-Must/index.ph… 1 of 2 12/6/2016 3:03 PM constructed buildings. Though a project designer can specify the required sealing level for each duct type, the only way to verify the effectiveness of the duct sealing is by duct leak testing.

It is important that design professionals specify duct leakage testing and have the commissioning provider observe duct leak testing of high- and medium-pressure ductwork in accordance with SMACNA’s HVAC Air Duct Leakage Test Manual. It is also important that the commissioning provider evaluate the building’s controls.

Allowable duct leakage rates specified are around 10%. However, for high performing buildings, designers may elect to reduce the allowable leakage amount in an effort to further reduce the energy consumption of the air moving systems. By specifying SMACNA duct leakage testing for medium- and high-pressure air duct systems integrated with commissioning in their projects, design professionals can be confident that their building will meet the high performing requirements of the owner.

The survey by the BCA also noted that a majority of respondents felt duct leakage is most prevalent in existing buildings. This should come as no surprise to individuals in the building industry. Many of the existing buildings that are prime candidates for services such as energy audits or retro-commissioning were built 15 or more years ago. Even if duct leakage testing was performed when the buildings were constructed, the sealant materials can be either near the end of their useful life or have begun to deteriorate, which leads to increased duct leakage.

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Typical building maintenance programs do not include observations and maintenance of the duct sealants, and even if they did it would be nearly impossible for all seams and joints to be evaluated, let alone resealed from the exterior. What is the answer? Very cost-effective products that can be applied to the interior of the air distribution system that can seal most air loss paths. Maintaining a sealed air distribution system should be included in a building’s operation and maintenance (O&M) budgets, similar to sealants for the building enclosure. This is a simple way for building owners to keep their buildings’ energy consumption low.

If owners elect to have energy audit or retro-commissioning services performed on their building, they should require that these professionals evaluate the leakage of the existing ductwork. This can provide the owner with a low-cost energy measure that can potentially have a very low payback period.

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It is clear to the building industry that duct leakage is an issue. For buildings looking to be labeled as high performing buildings, it can be a significant issue. Therefore, it is imperative that engineers require duct leak testing and that commissioning providers ensure duct leakage is minimized. The simplest way to stop or significantly reduce duct leakage is to require testing and verification of the air distribution and exhaust systems’ installation and HVAC control function through the design and commissioning process.

Source: Aeroseal; authors H. Jay Enck, Member ASHRAE, HBDP, BEAP, CPMP, CxAP, LEED Fellow, cofounder/chief technical officer and David Cantrill, P.E., Member ASHRAE, BEAP, CCP, branch manager/commissioning authority/project manager, both with Commissioning and Green Building Solutions, Inc.

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

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See how Aeroseal works:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heLz6bR_uYw&feature=youtu.be

Game-Changing Study Finds Aeroseal a Cost-Effective Solution for Duct Leakage in Commercial Buildings

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Historically, duct leakage has often been viewed as a performance issue rather than an energy efficiency issue. Not anymore! As noted in a recent Building Solutions blog post, duct leakage is actually the Number 1 culprit when it comes to energy waste in commercial buildings. The growing recognition of duct leakage as a major cause of HVAC energy waste provided the impetus for a study on retrofit duct sealing conducted by the Center for Energy Efficiency (CEE) in Minnesota.

CEE

This four-year study and pilot project had several phases, beginning with the characterization and measurement of duct leakage in several types of Minnesota commercial and institutional (C&I) buildings. In the next phase, a subset of the C&I duct systems were sealed using both conventional and aerosol sealing methods. Finally the estimated energy savings and cost effectiveness of retrofit sealing measures were analyzed in order to develop screening criteria to identify cost-effective duct sealing opportunities.

The recently released study findings confirm that duct leakage in existing buildings has emerged as a new energy savings opportunity.  In fact, about 10% to 15% of Minnesota C&I buildings were found to have appropriate operational characteristics and leakage rates that are high enough to justify retrofit duct sealing work with a moderate to good payback of less than 7 years. In addition, the study found that duct sealing from the inside using the aerosol sealing method was effective in a variety of scenarios, often reducing leakage effectively to zero including:

  • Initially tight and leaky ductwork
  • Supply and exhaust ductwork
  • Upstream and downstream ductwork

The Center for Energy and Environment conducts technology and market assessments to identify tomorrow’s best clean energy strategies. This retrofit duct leakage study was conducted for the benefit of Minnesota’s Conservation Improvement Program (CIP) with funding from the Department of Commerce, Division of Energy Resources.

Source: Aeroseal

Aspen Air Duct Cleaning is an approved Aeroseal Dealer, licensed and ensured, and a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) and National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI).

Please contact Aspen Air Duct Cleaning at 1-800-931-6653 for an Air Duct System Inspection and to learn more about how sealing air duct leaks can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy costs. Or email info@aspenenvironmentalservices.com.

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